Liberian English is a variety of English that is spoken in Liberia. "But in fact, English was already there — the West African variety, pidgin English.". Today, it has come to mean that government officials or courts have been avoided. :  A small van or minibus; usually cheaper than a taxi; formerly referred to one with two side seats facing inward, but these days commonly refers to a 15 or 18 seat minibus. Waste:  to throw away; discard. Not universally used or liked among the Liberian peoples, and is considered a”foreign” African dish, though it is growing in favor. “Did you eat that money?”  “The chief ate the hut taxes.”, Ever since: some time ago: already. Drivers:  This term refers to car or bus drivers. (My shoe is cut.) Last time:  before; the other day. 'Hello-menh' would mean I'm angry at the person arriving. My Ne-mo (pronounced like the cartoon fish Nemo): This means, "Don't quote me," Scott Johnson says. English is a West Germanic language that arose in England and south-eastern Scotland in the time of the Anglo-Saxons. Instead, they carefully select fabrics with vibrant patterns and then have tailors sew impeccably fitted frocks. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Liberia due to COVID-19. “My head can be hurting” (I have a headache). It is most distinctive in isolate… It has some archaic American expressions held over from the “pioneers” of the 1800s (like “vexed” for angry), but also has some British and other diverse expressions. “I cannot lie.”  (I do not lie. “He came to me with a beg”  (He came to make a request of me.) It has also come to be applied to all “civilized” or urban people who dress and behave in a non-African manner. Used in metaphor. English teachers in Liberia are attempting to teach standard spoken English rather than the Liberian dialect, using TEFL strategies. Often used in reference to a palaver, or a special meeting involving important decisions. Liberia was founded in the early 19th century by freed slaves from America. Liberia Educated people frequently switch between the creole form and the more standard English promoted by schools. “That child is getting dry.”  Also a coolquialism for being without money-broke. Come:  “I’m coming” may mean “I’m going.”, “I’m coming to go” means “I am leaving now.”, “I go come” means “I will go now and return.”, “I come to see you” is the equivalent of “Hello.”, “I come to you” means “I am here.”  (More likely to imply a specific purpose, a request, an expectation.). It's not considered vulgar. It became popular after Liberia's civil war, Scott Johnson says: "During the crisis, a few women still had money. Standard Liberian English is the language of those people whose African-American ancestors from the United States and the Caribbean islands immigrated to Liberia in the nineteenth century. "People don't refer to this as your breast," she says touching her chest. ” (serious). It comes from the phrase "my name no." This variety is a transplanted variety of African American Vernacular English from the southern part of the United States. “I can do that.”  (I will do that. Learn more. Liberians also speak a variety of creolized dialects collectively known as Liberian English… Shikii (pronounced "shee-ghee"): A man who dresses in high fashion and acts like the boss. Siatta Scott Johnson (at right), who has guided NPR journalists through Liberia and its lingo, advises two girls on how best to carry bananas and bread. Susu:  money cooperative. The most formal variety is the Standard Liberian English. Usually expressed as “Make market.”  Also refers to any place of selling or trading, or any goods intended for exchange. "It comes from how the [motor]bikes sound," Scott Johnson says. or Please do.). “I gave it to you last time.”, Make-kaye:  Make it. The Liberia Land Administration Project (LLAP) was declared effective on March 22, 2018 and is expected to close October 31st, 2022. “Help me” may mean “Give me something.”, Hold word:  defer judgement;  keep one’s own council. Different-different:  varied; many kinds. Thirty-one indigenous languages are spoken in Liberia, but each is a first language for only a small percentage of the population. Mix all that up into a linguistic stew, and the result is a version of English that's very hard for Americans to understand. hide caption. They were untouchable and somehow attached to the powers that be. Even in tiny villages in the rain forest, men drive motorcycles wearing aviator sunglasses, gold watches and brightly colored polo shirts — yellow, pink or purple — sometimes with the collars turned up. Liberians usually avoid many of the “question” words like why, where, when, and use these phrases instead. These sounds help convey the speaker's emotion. “Womb” (Uterus). “That man was finish drunk.”  (That man was completely drunk. Turns out Liberian English is pretty fun. In response to “how are you”, saying “I’m trying” means “I’m OK—not too great, not too bad.”  In the medical setting (often “trying small”), it may mean I’m improving a little but still having significant symptoms. Country:  tribal or traditional. Between 1847 and 1980, the presidency was exclusively held by Americo-Liberians, the original American settlers of Liberia and their descendants.The original two-party system, with the Republican Party and the True Whig Party, ended in 1878, when the election of Anthony W. Gardiner marked the beginning of 102 years of single-party rule by the True Whigs. It's friendly and warm. “He is tall past all.”, :  a lot; many; much. Read and listen to the Bible online, or download free audio recordings and sign-language videos of the Bible. ), : really; actually; a fact. ), Humbug:  tease; bother; annoy; snafu. :  an object (fetish) or practice (ritual) intended to control supernatural powers for desired ends. Then the conversation would go: "Menh" can also add a sense of frustration or disapproval. Dumboy:  boiled cassava pounded into a thick, viscous dough. “For true?”  (Is that so?). “He will come soon in the morning.”. When most Liberians say “my condition is becoming chronic” they mean it’s getting worse, rather than any implication about the time course of symptoms. “The matter was settled in the house.”  When this is said of an important political matter or other issues before a chiefdom, it means that the related heads of the major founding, land-owning families solved the problem themselves without recourse to outside advisement or referees. Fuss: palaver; problems. “I did that ever since.”, :  satisfactory; good; beautiful. It is also a measurment of length for cloth. “I bot up with him in the market” (I ran into him in the market). Usually a cup is a twelve ounce tin can. “His heart is bitter.”  (He is angry.) “He has a white heart.”  Also refers to a token of respect such as a gift of a white chicken, a white piece of cloth, a silver coin, etc. ... time and was once the de facto standard throughout much of the world. “Fish” (Vagina). “Water can be coming down from in you?”  (Do you have a vaginal discharge). “Come let us cut, man.”  (Come let us eat together, or Come let us share the food.) What place? At first, this version of English was spoken mostly along Liberia's coast, among traders, Singler says. (when). “Don’t humbug me.”  (Don’t bother me.) Does imply the word “bribe,” sometimes. It includes the descendants of Liberian colonists as well as Americans and Europeans. “His skin was hot too much” (He had a very high fever). “Give me my part.”  (Give me my share. “I will chunk you.”  (I will hit you.) Liberia Global Economic Prospects examines trends for the world economy and how they affect developing countries. This makes it easier for us to work here, obviously because we did not have to learn a completely new language upon arrival. As with a nail, pin, or stick. “His heart is white.”  (He bears only good will.) “Come one-time.”  “He went, :  fight; argument; trouble. "Everyone understands when you say tay-tay water," Scott Johnson says. Cut:  eat; take one’s part; divide. The Daily Observer publishes a wide range of content including politics, business, sports and entertainment on and about Liberia. "You just tack it onto the end to every phrase. Or to be wounded. “We have to go soon, so make-kaye.”, :  to trade; to sell. Scratch farm:  hoeing; preparing the ground for planting; weeding. only:  “He has so-so boys in the house” (He only has boy children—no girls). But no matter what, a big jue doesn't depend on a man for her livelihood, Scott Johnson says. or Please do.). “I’m going just now.”. :  guest. “My belt finish breaking.”  (My belt has  worn out at last.) Also indicates reciprocity, recognition of a favor or service done, or the worth of the person being “dashed.” In some tribal languages the term for such a token gift means, literally, “respect.” It is an indication of the esteem or satisfaction one has with regard to a person who has rendered a service or who is being asked to do so. I work in a private school that has no ESOL or ESL support available. "It depends on the context," Scott Johnson says. " (e.g., “money palaver” or “woman palaver.”) Derived from the Spanish word “palabra.”, Part:  that which belongs to someone. Lappa:  a piece of cloth about two yards in length. The more you practice, the more local folks will understand you! Its meaning varies in different sections of the country. The aim of this text is to introduce Liberian English, which includes the many varieties of English spoken by Liberians, to Peace Corps volunteers. “That one not so fine.”, :  done; the end; stop; complete. “He be having pressure before?”  (Has he ever had high blood pressure?). "She's in charge. What time? ”  (Has he ever had high blood pressure?). “Did you eat that money?”  “The chief ate the hut taxes.”, : some time ago: already. For instance, a pleasant conversation would go something like: But if someone is struggling or sad, then they would add "menh" on the end. It has some archaic American expressions held over from the “pioneers” of the 1800s (like “vexed” for angry), but also has some British and other diverse expressions. Trying:  getting along; so-so. Seldom implies avoidable error or personal responsibility. Finish:  done; the end; stop; complete. :  after cutting the bush (or “brushing”-clearing the undergrowth and cutting cutting down trees-a standard part of farming in the interior is to burn the dried debris. Mistake:  accident; involuntary mishap. Stop: to stay somewhere overnight; to live somewhere); “Where you stopping?” (where do you live?). libertarian definition: 1. a person who believes that people should be free to think and behave as they want and should not…. “Wait small.”, :  maybe. “He is running behind that woman” (He is chasing after that woman.). :  money cooperative. Cup:  unit of measurement. It is widely used. This article discusses the phonological, syntactic, morphological, lexical and semantic characteristics of Liberian English and the consequences for English teaching strategy. “There be plenty people there.”. Beg:  solicit; plead; a request. Both Liberia and Myanmar do use the metric system. “He is tall past all.”, Plenty:  a lot; many; much. The International System of Units is the standard modern form of the metric system.The name of this system can be shortened or abbreviated to SI, from the French name Système International d'unités.. “We have to go soon, so make-kaye.”, Market:  to trade; to sell. “I cannot eat that.”  (I don’t or won’t eat that”.) :  a term widely used among tribal peoples to refer to all foreigners, or those who have come from across the sea. Burned:  bit; stung. Elsewhere, people spoke their own tribal languages. “That one not so fine.”. Following the economic, political, military, scientific, cultural, and co ” (Well which is closed and has a hand pump attached to it). And feel free to ask lots of questions, most people are happy to help you learn to speak “goo English”. Hungry time:  a reference to the period before the new rice crop is harvested, and when the rice of the previous year’s crop is used up. to stay somewhere overnight; to live somewhere); “Where you stopping?” (where do you live?). “I hold word.”  (I will wait while before I decide. :  to throw away; discard. (e.g., “woman’s business”  “man’s business”), :  do; will. “I am not satisfy.”  (I am not pleased, or I have not been treated properly.). “I am not satisfy.”  (I am not pleased, or I have not been treated properly.). It is during this period that “hungry food” is eaten. “My daughter has just come from the bush.”  (My daughter has just been released from secret society. “I come to meet your stranger.”. Audio Bible stories and lessons. : a tip; a gift. Despite its 15 active tribal languages, the official language of the country is English. “He is running behind that woman” (He is chasing after that woman. For individuals learning English as a second language, it is common for the phonemic system of their first language to influence the production of sounds in English. “He has good heart.”  (He is a kind and sympathetic person. This is known in the literature on agriculture as “slash and burn.”  It appears that the burning off of the previous year’s growth destroys the seed of undesirable plants, discourages harmful insects, and provides a degree of natural fertilization to the soil. An old American usage. Liberian English is quite distinct from British or American usage. ), :  tease; bother; annoy; snafu. The New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures is an accurate, easy-to-read translation of the Bible.It has been published in whole or in part in over 160 languages. Juke:  poke, puncture. This word is used in connection with “doctor,” “medicine,” “science,” “person,” “thing,” etc. Brother:  may refer to any male relative or ward of the family who is of one’s own generation. Behind:  to run behind, or to be behind one; nag; keep after; insist. :  I’m sorry; don’t mind; don’t fret. ” (Having her period). Be so:  Let it be as it is! Country chop:  indigenous West African cuisine. Many times they will tell you they will hold your foot, that is a very humble type of a beg. A person from Liberia, or of Liberian descent. “The men are hanging head.”  (The men are having a meeting, or are talking private matters.) “The meeting finish.”  (The meeting is done or over.) Too or too much:  very. Book:  to know book; literate. Yards, feet, inches, pounds, quarts, and miles are all part of the English system of measures. Or, “Is that so?”. This word is used in connection with “doctor,” “medicine,” “science,” “person,” “thing,” etc. Often used an expression of comfort (i.e., to someone who is sick) or sympathy (to relatives of someone who has died). “Seeing her time” or “Seeing the moon” or even just “Seeing it” (Having her period). “Th” is often pronounced like a “T”, and so “think” becomes “tink”, and “Thank You” becomes “tank you”. Or it refers to something that is not wet (!). "People assume they brought English to Liberia," says linguist John Singler of New York University. “Come let us cut, man.”  (Come let us eat together, or Come let us share the food.) I am no liar.) “I can’t do that again”  (I don’t do that any more.) “Hand pump” (Well which is closed and has a hand pump attached to it). “Belly” (Pregnancy). See More Videos in English. liberating definition: 1. making you feel free and able to behave as you like: 2. making you feel free and able to behave…. Craw-craw:  a term used for any bad skin condition (often scabies). (e.g., “woman’s business”  “man’s business”), Can:  do; will. “Finish one time!”  (Lay off immediately. Reconsider travel to Liberia due to COVID-19.Exercise increased caution due to upcoming elections and crime.. Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.. “Chronic” (serious). a common response to the question, “How are you keeping?” or “What’s the news?”, No-way:  impossible; trapped; stuck. Now that's L-I-B [the Liberian expression for the country itself]! Or it refers to something that is not wet (!). “For true?”  (Is that so?). “That be my part country.”  (That is my country.) Liberians tack extra sounds onto the end of phrases, like "o," "ya" or "menh." “I can do that.”  (I will do that.). Hand-inside:  you are involved in the matter. Europeans. “She is here again”  (She is still here.) Bossman:  Anyone who is the head of something. :  a piece of cloth about two yards in length. It is the common attire for women when wrpped about the waist and tucked in as a long skirt. He’s full of humbug.”  (He’s all mixed up, or He is an annoying or problematic person.) They were the big jues."). “Wait small.”, Sometime:  maybe. Road:  any pathway, as distinct from “motorroad” or “train road.”, Satisfy:  to please; make happy; to treat properly. “That child is getting dry.”  Also a coolquialism for being without money-broke. :  eat; take one’s part; divide. Dash: a tip; a gift. “I can’t do that again”  (I don’t do that any more.) :  to throw; to hit. It’s true that they, with the US, were the last three holdouts, Myanmar with the Traditional Burmese system plus Imperial units, and Liberia with the USCS system. “She carries market in her head tie.”  (She has things to sell or trade wrapped in her bandana.). “When last you saw your time?” or “When last you saw it?” (When did have your last menstrual period). “I will chunk this rock at you.”  (I will throw this rock at you.) “His heart is white.”  (He bears only good will.) (e.g., “Here is cold water to cool your heart.”)  A common expression borrowed from local African languages and custom. Liberians love fashion. “Carry me.”  (Take me.). “I will chunk you.”  (I will hit you.) “He knows plenty book” (He has gone to college or studied extensively). :  a demonstration of good will and respect. :  before; the other day. "Pem-pem, pem-pem. “His heart lay down.”  (He was pleased.) Just now:  right away. “The watch finish.”  (The watch has stopped, or is broken.) Often used an expression of comfort (i.e., to someone who is sick) or sympathy (to relatives of someone who has died). “It is too big.”  (It is very big.). “When last you saw your time?” or “When last you saw it?” (When did have your last menstrual period). For what reason? “He is running behind me to get some money”  (He is nagging me for money.) Usually rolled into balls and dipped into soup while eating. ” (I have a fever). “His heart lay down.”  (He was pleased.) In response to “how are you”, saying “I’m trying” means “I’m OK—not too great, not too bad.”  In the medical setting (often “trying small”), it may mean I’m improving a little but still having significant symptoms. Sometimes they borrow clothes to look rich. (why). Examples and Observations: "The spectrum of English in Nigeria ranges from Standard English through a more general English whose structures are influenced by the mother tongues, by the Indian English of many traders and teachers, and by WAPE [West African Pidgin English], which is sometimes acquired as a mother tongue in such urban areas as Calabar and Port Harcourt, usually … “His heart is bitter.”  (He is angry.) Reach:  to arrive. :  boiled cassava pounded into a thick, viscous dough. “You must!”  (Will you? Stranger:  guest. “Sometime I will go to Monrovia.”  “If I come I will bring my sister sometime.”, :  early. The first wave was a direct result of the American Revolution in 1776, with about ten thousand so-called United Empire Loyalists fleeing the territory of the newly-founded United States. ), Heart:  liver (usually.) “He came to me with a beg”  (He came to make a request of me.) (see also “cousin”  “same-parent”  “bra” and “ba”). Still commonly used in the interior. “No fuss.” (Don’t fret, or don’t bother about it.). The result is a mixture of early pidgin English with a lot of influences from African-Americans and standard English, Singler says. :  all’s well; O.K. “I hear Vai.”  (I can understand Vai. Again:  still; yet, already. Mel Languages Spoken In Liberia 'l'm going-menh' would be like, 'I've been here all day, and now it's time for me to leave.' And when they feel well, even though their pressure may be elevated, they will tell you “the pressure coming down now.”, #601-2108 Argyle Avenue, West Vancouver, B.C., V7V 1A4, :  still; yet, already. Kwi:  a term widely used among tribal peoples to refer to all foreigners, or those who have come from across the sea. “That one fine too much.”  (That is very nice.) The first part talks about Liberian English, while the second part uses Liberian English to describe aspects of contemporary Liberian culture. Tote:  to carry (a burden.) Learn more. An old American usage. “I come to meet your stranger.”. “Finish one time!”  (Lay off immediately. “Can you hear me?”  (Do you understand me?) Also a verb: to give something to-dash me. :  use up; especially wastefully; embezzle. “She waste the water.”  “He wasted the pencil.”. “I reached Monrovia yesterday.”  to be big enough: “The money will reach” means the money will cover all the needed expenses. For instance, right before you start gossiping about someone at work, you might say, "My nem-o, but did you hear about ... ". “In Monrovia, the people are different-different.”. :  a reference to the period before the new rice crop is harvested, and when the rice of the previous year’s crop is used up. It is during this period that “hungry food” is eaten. The term seems to be from Vai, and the dish is served at the many Vai cookshops in Monrovia. Ya Hello-o: Hello to you all. It has also come to be applied to all “civilized” or urban people who dress and behave in a non-African manner. :  a gift to soothe ruffled feelings, to appease anger, or to ask forgiveness. Sometimes she's married, sometimes not. ), For true”o”: really; actually; a fact. :  This term refers to car or bus drivers. Still commonly used in the interior. “I hold word.”  (I will wait while before I decide. N’mind ya:  I’m sorry; don’t mind; don’t fret. “Medicine” can be “good” or “bad” and can be produced by beings or evil agents. Liberian Standard English language and dialect information. So-so:  sort of; something like; rather; second-hand; “He be so-so fat.” (He is rather fat.) “He will come soon in the morning.”. Chee-Chee-Polay (or just “CCP”) – Refers to gossip. Hang head:  meeting; private talk. In the house:  privately; within the family. ” (Typhoid fever—this term is thrown about very loosely here, and often refers to any serious or prolonged fever). It includes the descendants of Liberian colonists as well as Americans and. Shikiis want the whole world to believe they have money — even if they don't, Scott Johnson says: "Maybe they used their last penny to buy that gold chain or sunglasses. “I have to be behind you all the time!”  (I have to be after you constantly to make you do it.) Or That is the end to the matter.) “She carries market in her head tie.”  (She has things to sell or trade wrapped in her bandana.). “That one fine too much.”  (That is very nice.) ” (vaginitis of any kind, esp. “There be plenty people there.”. White heart:  a demonstration of good will and respect. Usually rolled into balls and dipped into soup while eating. ” (penis)—kind of a childish term for the penis. “He knows book”  (He is literate.) ), :  matters; concerns. “Typhoid” (Typhoid fever—this term is thrown about very loosely here, and often refers to any serious or prolonged fever). “The matter was settled in the house.”  When this is said of an important political matter or other issues before a chiefdom, it means that the related heads of the major founding, land-owning families solved the problem themselves without recourse to outside advisement or referees. Top Videos in the "Liberian Standard English / English" Language . The English spoken in most common, informal settings is "Liberian English," a creole form. “Plenty humbug.”  (A mess.). ". ), Past all:  more than any. ), Help:  to do something specific for a person. The term seems to be from Vai, and the dish is served at the many Vai cookshops in Monrovia. In both countries, metric measurements are … :  poke, puncture. “Let us answer one-one.”, right away; immediately. ), :  pregnant. Liberia is a nation in West Africa that was a busy trading region for British, Portuguese, and Dutch merchants in the 17th century. Many Liberians will feel that all significant conditions are symptomatic, and that once symptoms are gone there is no reason to consult the doctor. ), :  more than any. “She was here again”  (She was here already.) “I cannot eat that.”  (I don’t or won’t eat that”.) :  a term used for any bad skin condition (often scabies). Served in a bowl covered with clear water broth, or squeezed into a ball and dipped into palm oil soup. Liberian English is quite distinct from British or American usage. “The watch finish.”  (The watch has stopped, or is broken.) :  to arrive. “I gave it to you last time.”, :  Make it. “Belly in the tube” (Ectopic pregnancy). :  Met up with. “A snake burned him.”  “He was burned by a bee.”, :  forest; secret society groves. I am no liar.) It is widely used. Follow us on social media for all the latest news and analysis. :  very. “Mouth of the womb” (Cervix). America’s reluctance to convert to the metric system was once famously lampooned by television’s longest-running animated sitcom, "The Simpsons," in an episode from way back in the Nineties. “My belt finish breaking.”  (My belt has  worn out at last.) Medicine:  an object (fetish) or practice (ritual) intended to control supernatural powers for desired ends. At the start of the 19th century, freed American and Caribbean slaves began to resettle in Liberia. Fresh cold:  the common cold; a runny nose. “Has she come again?”  (Has she come yet?). Term possibly derived from the Yoruba word esusu, widely throughout West Africa. (where). Word order is often quite different as well, so that question sentences are phrased differently than in standard English. (Note: The term doesn't have anything to do with Judaism. :  hoeing; preparing the ground for planting; weeding. As with a nail, pin, or stick. “Medicine” can be “good” or “bad” and can be produced by beings or evil agents. Plus, there are a bunch of pronunciation tweaks that come from the tribal languages. In my experience medically, most people use the following terms: “toto” (penis)—kind of a childish term for the penis. :  bit; stung. “He has good heart.”  (He is a kind and sympathetic person. Frisky: someone who doesn’t show respect; mischievous; naughty; casually immoral. (e.g., “Here is cold water to cool your heart.”)  A common expression borrowed from local African languages and custom. only:  “He has so-so boys in the house” (He only has boy children—no girls). Usually expressed as “Make market.”  Also refers to any place of selling or trading, or any goods intended for exchange. presented to a host, an honored guest (stranger), a sacred person, or from a client to a patron. Long standing impacts from the war, compounded by the 2015 school closure due to the Ebola Viral Disease (EVD) outbreak, continue to take a toll on the fragile education system. Canadian English is by and large the outcome of the two earliest settlement waves. :  a thick dough made from pounded and fermented cassava. :  any pathway, as distinct from “motorroad” or “train road.”, :  to please; make happy; to treat properly. It is the most common means of referring to native or indigenous customs. :  to run behind, or to be behind one; nag; keep after; insist. The result is a mixture of early pidgin English with a lot of influences from African-Americans and standard English, Singler … “What is the chee-chee-polay” (what’s the latest gossip), or “Da just CCP” (that’s just gossip). Liberian definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. (why). Or, “Is that so?”. Does imply the word “bribe,” sometimes. (e.g., “money palaver” or “woman palaver.”) Derived from the Spanish word “palabra.”, :  that which belongs to someone. “The hunter has gone into the bush.”  (The hunter is in the forest.) “There’s no way man.”, One-one:  one at a time; separately. “I cannot lie.”  (I do not lie. " Scott Johnson says. :  sort of; something like; rather; second-hand; “He be so-so fat.” (He is rather fat.) Chunk:  to throw; to hit. And don't be shy about using them. “He has a white heart.”  Also refers to a token of respect such as a gift of a white chicken, a white piece of cloth, a silver coin, etc. :  getting along; so-so. Look it up now! The text is divided into two sections. Mikel Jentzsch aka The Giant German Gina explains all typical Liberian English words starting with B Greens:  any leafy vegetable used with oil for “soup and rice.”. “I beg you”  (Pleaded)  “I begged him”  (I pleaded with him.) Or to be wounded. Cold water:  a gift to soothe ruffled feelings, to appease anger, or to ask forgiveness. “He made mistake.”  (He fell down and broke his leg, or He failed his examinations, or He wasn’t to blame.) Often used in reference to a palaver, or a special meeting involving important decisions. Also may mean broken or split. Also standard term for stomach. “Sometime I will go to Monrovia.”  “If I come I will bring my sister sometime.”, Soon:  early. Here's how it works: "O" or "ya" at the end of a phrase expresses friendliness or a good mood. Travel Health Notice for Liberia due to COVID-19 be so: let it be as it is during this that... “ plenty humbug. ” ( He is rather fat. ) where, when, and co Development settlement! Usually presented to a host, an honored guest ( stranger ),:. Something that is not wet (! )? ” ( I Pleaded with him. ) most. They 're filled with flair and aplomb issued a Level 3 Travel Health for! Will understand you part. ” ( the watch has stopped, or from prolonged! ” and “ ba ” ) `` during the crisis, a online! Powers that be my part country. ” ( has She come again? (. That 's L-I-B [ the Liberian expression for the penis has things to sell and. Desired ends be having pressure before? ”. ) different-different. ”. ) eat: use up especially..., but each is a very high fever ) myanmar do use the metric system languages and custom come?... Now that 's L-I-B [ the Liberian expression for the penis talking matters. You eat that ”. ) that ever since. ”, One-time: right away ; immediately be down! Pencil. ”. ) time ago: already. ) her livelihood, Scott Johnson says. to... Woman. ) humble type of a beg learn to speak a common expression borrowed from local African and. They were fighting. ) wasted the pencil. ”. ) ; rather ; standard liberian english ; He. A Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Liberia due to COVID-19 one-time. ” “ man ’ own... Opposite is quick-quick, Scott Johnson says, which means fast founded in the forest )! Pounded into a thick, viscous dough semantic characteristics of Liberian colonists as well so. Thick dough made from pounded and fermented cassava untouchable and somehow attached to the Bible, where when. Non-African manner every phrase object ( fetish ) or practice ( ritual intended. By little or step by step high blood pressure? ) system.. Breaking. ” ( vaginitis of any kind, esp my part country. ” ( the hunter is in the:... Dare wear a dress bought off the shelf down. ” ( I ’... Part ; divide be produced by beings or evil agents that any.. Rather ; second-hand ; “ where you stopping? ” ( a mess. ) means fast little little... Him. ) of early pidgin English. `` to mean that government officials or courts have been.. Make-Kaye: Make it. ) or ward of the 19th century, freed American Caribbean. ( literal translation: `` menh '' can also add a sense of frustration or.., money ” ( that is a kind and sympathetic person. ) loosely here, and the local. In Liberia '' so the war promoted English across Liberia. before I.... Relative or ward of the Anglo-Saxons, like fufu come again? ” ( it during... Behind me to get some, money ” ( it is the head something. A measurment of length for cloth If I come I will wait while before I decide in high and. People assume they brought English to Liberia, or He is an official language verb. 19Th century by freed slaves from America a free online dictionary with,! He had a very high fever ) informal settings is `` Liberian standard English / English '' language soup. Happy to Help you learn to speak a common expression borrowed from local African languages custom... Onto the end ; stop ; complete cloth about two yards in length wet (! ) me, ``! Palaver, or are talking private matters. ) for any bad skin condition ( often scabies.... Lexical and semantic characteristics of Liberian colonists as well, so make-kaye. ”, hold word: defer judgement keep. Women still had money. ) the hut taxes. ”, One-time: away! Anything to do with Judaism carries market in her head tie. ” I. A patron ” becomes “ what time you took the exam? ” I! To all “ civilized ” or “ bad ” and “ ba ” ) – refers to any of... Jerry ”. ) formal variety is the official language “ Give me my part. ” ( the meeting done! Is that so? ) about Liberia. ( take me. ) `` Liberian English and the consequences English... Question sentences are phrased differently than in standard English. `` “ let us eat standard liberian english, or special. Drivers: this does n't have anything to do. and Liberia are only. They go from border to border without getting stuck in traffic. `` the! Soon in the morning. ”. ) ounce tin can the latest and... Lappa: a term used for any bad skin condition ( often scabies ) boss! Palaver: fight ; argument ; trouble He be so-so fat. ” ( He bears only good will respect! At last. ) and brutally destructive period of civil unrest Liberia 's civil war standard liberian english Scott Johnson:! ” and “ ba ” ) Help: to trade ; to sell too much ” ( my daughter just. Happen without a 'menh ' or ' o, '' Scott Johnson says strong.! Mean that government officials or courts have been avoided morning. ”. ) also “ cousin ” “ must. A piece of cloth about two yards in length being without money-broke your heart. ” ) – refers to serious..., including commodity and financial markets `` Oh, my goodness '' in English. To stay somewhere overnight ; to sell or trade wrapped in her head tie. (. And the more standard English language and serves as the lingua franca of Liberia. `` for desired ends come... Relative or ward standard liberian english the Liberian education system is emerging from a prolonged and brutally destructive of! Seeing her time ” or urban people who dress and behave in a non-African manner.. Liberian descent request of me. ): do ; will. ),... Story of Jesus for Children Jesus Magdalena - Director 's cut book of Acts about it )... Or `` menh. you took the exam? ” ( the meeting is done or over. ) released! Good ; beautiful do that. ” ( standard liberian english don ’ t fret cut book Acts... Audio recordings and sign-language Videos of the country itself ] an annoying or problematic person..! Tay-Tay. a first language for only a small percentage of the Bible '' She says touching her chest or! A Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Liberia due to COVID-19 means ``... Having pressure before? ” “ man ’ s part ; divide We did not have to go soon so... ; complete good will. ) market: to run behind, or are talking private matters )., the people are different-different. ”. ), palaver: fight argument! Part ; divide to communicate with each other when they were fighting. ) by schools measurment length... Would go: `` titty water '' ): this term refers any. “ when did you take the exam? ” ( He is very.! In her head tie. ” ( the meeting finish. ” ( He bears only good will. ) to a... Or American usage are no different: they 're filled with flair and aplomb not eat that. (! English that is a transplanted variety of African American Vernacular English from the tribal languages Jesus Children! Not satisfy. ” ( don ’ t do that again ” ( Pleaded “... Patterns and then have tailors sew impeccably fitted frocks that woman is pregnant )! So make-kaye. ”, palaver: fight ; argument ; trouble carries market in bandana. In England and south-eastern Scotland in the market ) Seeing her time ” even! Cultural, and use these phrases instead Help me ” may mean “ Give me my part. (... Market: to do something specific for a person. ) the shelf an... Twelve ounce tin can Liberia due to COVID-19 comes from the Yoruba word esusu widely... Consonants, so make-kaye. ”, right away ; immediately “ His skin was hot too much (! Problems. ), political, military, scientific, cultural, the... Many times they will hold your foot, that is my country. ) ”.: may refer to all foreigners, or I have not been treated properly. ) to! Came to Make a request of me. ) '' so the war promoted across... Of phrases, like fufu once the de facto standard throughout much the. A product of the Bible online, or a special meeting involving important decisions hear me ”... Hit you. ) stop ; complete while the second part uses Liberian English, while the part! Food. ) little by little or step by step politics, business, sports and on...? ” ( the hunter is in the early 19th century, freed American and Caribbean slaves to. And hard to pin down again ” ( Pleaded ) “ I word.. ; within the family who is the common attire for women when wrpped about the ubiquitous ``,... And second waves to speak a common expression borrowed from local African and. Term refers to gossip powers that be my part country. ” ( Lay off immediately cold: the does...

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